Welcome to our Dog Blog with Free Tips!

dog blog with free tips
Welcome to our award winning Dog Blog with Free Tips on training and interesting advice with cute dog pics every week.  Learn about all topics dog related, from training and behavior advice to fun facts about dogs.  The Pooch Coach also shares her clients’ stories with you, which she hopes will inspire you to work with your dog to help them become the best dog they can be.

 

Never give up hope!  Whether it’s a slight inconvenience or annoyance, or a scary, huge issue, you can always get help for your pup.  Check out some of the great success stories, get some tips, and then give us a call if you’d like to join the pack!

 

If there are any topics you’d like to know more about, let us know!   We’re always looking for great ideas to add to our blog!

 

In August of 2016, Thoroughly Reviewed named The Pooch Coach Dog Blog with Free Tips one of the top 50 dog blogs in the world!  In September of 2016, Feedspot awarded us as one of the “top 100 dog blogs on the planet”! In November of 2017, we were honored with another award for Top 50 dog training blogs in the world by Mr Kortings Code.  In january, 2018, we got ranked on of the top dog blogs by Top Ranked Blogs.

 

top dog training blog

Dog Blog with Free Tips

HOW TO SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR DOG

HOW TO SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR DOG

HOW TO SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR DOG

HOW TO SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR DOG

I savored every moment I had with Kompis in our last week together.

It’s very difficult and painful decision to decide when and how to say goodbye to your dog. I spoke to many people when trying to decide what the best thing for Kompis would be.  In addition to my good friends, I spoke to 4 vets, who all told me it was her time any time I felt was right, given her condition.  Yes, she could eat (with help) and poop (I had to help her not fall over), but she was no longer “here”.  Her mind/personality left us weeks ago, and it was only getting worse.  Her lost eyesight caused her to run into things constantly, and be a total hazard to herself.

 

I wanted to share with you the response I got from a veterinarian I’ve worked with before who lives in New Zealand.
I think it was the most well-worded and helpful of all the great advice I received.   I hope it can help you if & when you have to make this difficult decision as well.

 

Thank you, Sue Robb!  Here’s what she wrote to me:

 

“Quality of life is an important part of the decision on when is the best time. What many owners forget is that QOL also involves the humans in the family as well, perhaps because that is where the guilt feelings come. From what I have watched with Kompis, especially with the video clips that you have shown, is that her spark has been absent for a while. Her decline has been obvious, and like with all of our animal companions with their shorter life expectancies, her demise is inevitable. But if you are finding her care has become a burden, then I think you owe it to her to help move her on her way. She has been such a wonderful friend for you through her life: what a disservice it would be to only be able to remember her in her decline rather than in her strength.

 

Whenever you are able to make that final call, it will a time of regret, of recrimination, and of guilt. But I have watched many clients becoming angry at their pet because of the last few weeks, or expressed regret at not making the call earlier. There is no easy time to say “now”; we are never ready.

 

Guilt is part of the grief cycle. It comes for us all. But you have done so much with her over the years, and you don’t deserve to feel guilty. And neither of you deserve to find her last days a burden.

 

Euthanasia is a gift we can offer our pets. It relieves them from their struggles, it ends their pain, it is an act of love.”

 

HOW TO SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR DOG

The last professional photos of Kompis & me. Thanks, Pipi of Soulful Pet Photography.

how to say goodbye to your dog

Help for Blind Dogs

Help for Blind Dogs

HELP FOR BLIND DOGS

help for blind dogs

Kompis trying out her new Halo

Muffin’s Halo For Blind Dogs offers help for blind dogs.   They sent us one of their devices to try out with Kompis, whose cataracts have gotten progressively worse over the last few months, and now she’s almost completely blind.

 

Between her blindness & senility, she has been bumping into things frequently, and it breaks my heart – and scares me! So I was relieved to learn about this great product to protect our sight-limited fur babies.

 

Here is a 3 min video that shows me putting it on for the first time, and her trying it out both indoors & outdoors.

 

I was impressed! And I even discovered another special use for the device that I demonstrate at the end.

 

Thanks, Muffin’s Halo! You’ve made our lives much easier & safer!

 

 

HOW TO BEST FEED AN OLDER DOG

HOW TO BEST FEED AN OLDER DOG

HOW TO BEST FEED AN OLDER DOG

how to best feed an older dog

Kompis needs her water up high as well.
But not too high, or she chokes.

 

Many people wonder how to best feed an older dog.

 

The Pooch Coach created a video to demonstrate the best feeding techniques.

 

It’s helpful for all dogs to alleviate neck & back strain, and helps control spilling.

 

Below is a video with some quick tips on how to set up your dog’s eating & drinking places for easier access as they age.

 

For some general tips for dealing with senior dogs, click here.

 

Hope you find this helpful!

 

 

 

I also now raise my new puppy’s dish.  That way, they don’t develop neck & back issues over the years.  You can get these raised dishes at every pet store now.  This one is from Pottery Barn!

 

HOW TO BEST FEED AN OLDER DOG

Musik waiting patiently to eat from her new bowl.

March 2017 News & Tips

March 2017 News & Tips

March News & Tips

Hello!  Welcome to our March newsletter.  We hope you enjoy it.

SFDC Meetups for Pooch Coach clients. Come out and practice your handling skills and meet other past & present members of the Pooch Coach Pack. Our next Meetup with FREE training tips, behavior help, treats and socialization practice is:

 

Saturday, March 4th @ 12 noon – 2 PM
at Christopher Playground in SF.

 

Free demos, advice & treats from The Pooch Coach!

 

Come out with your dog for some socialization and some fun. Learn a new trick or 2. Have a question about your dog’s behavior?  The Pooch Coach will be offering free 1-1 advice to attendees.   It’s a great way to practice your dog’s greeting skills with other dogs as well as with humans… All overseen by an expert canine behaviorist.

 

If you are not a Pooch Coach client and would like to attend, please email us at info@poochcoach.com and we will let you know if we can accommodate you.

 

Free Professional photos by Soulful Pet Photography!

 

And all SF Dog Connectors Meetup attendees get free samples of Charlee Bear Dog treats for their pooch!

charlee bear dog treats sf dog connectors meetup

 


Here’s a video of people enjoying previous Meetups – hear what they have to say!

Click here to see Meetup testimonials

 

LAST CHANCE TO SIGN UP!  Only a few spots left for clients.
RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY!

(The weather should be OK, but we can meet by the Post Office out of the rain if needed)

 

Sign up on our Facebook pageClick here!  Sign up on Meetup.comClick here!
For more information about our monthly Meetups, Click here.

 

Please “like” our Facebook page or visit us at Meetup.com to ensure you don’t miss future events.


 Introducing:

Senior Moments…  A new series of tips

If you’re lucky enough to have your dog live a long healthy life (which more dogs are doing these days with improved food, supplements and vet care), then you’re also going to need to help your dog as he ages. While older dogs are great because they are generally calmer, and adapted & trained to your lifestyle, at some point they become elderly and need different & additional care.

 

I’ve been dealing with my dog, Kompis’ changes for a few months now. It’s been quite an exhausting struggle to watch her go blind and turn senile. She’s also much weaker now. She walks ridiculously slowly and falls easily.  It’s been heartbreaking.

 

But, the silver lining is that I’ve learned a great deal about the aging process – something they don’t really focus on with behavior/training courses, since older dogs don’t usually need to be trained.  I’ve read what articles there are, but I’m learning much more by living it.  And I want to share it with others to help them adjust to having an older dog.  Hopefully these tips will make you feel less alone in your struggles if you are dealing with an older dog.  And, if your dog is still young, these tips can help you be prepared.

 

My first Senior Tips blog with general info & tips is up here.

 

My YouTube channel has a new playlist of “Senior Moments” as well.  I’ll be adding to this as time goes on.

 

If you have senior tips or videos to share, please email me at info@poochcoach.com so I can share your info as well.  Let’s help each other through these agonizing times and help our dogs be as happy and comfortable as they can be during their last months & days.


Want more tips?

Check out The Pooch Coach’s Dog Channel & Blog!

Click here to visit our YouTube channel and get some free dog training tips & help with common behavior issues. We’re adding new videos regularly, so please subscribe to get notified of new fun & informational videos.

 

And click here to visit our award winning blog with tips on all sorts of topics that will help you with your pup. Like: What to do if your dog gets skunked, or tips for dealing with loud (scary) noises, and even info about how dogs see.

 

Over 11,500 fans can’t be wrong…  Join us on Facebook!

 

The Pooch Coach San Francisco Dog Training

Happy St Paddy’s Day!

Ready for more training?
Book an appt

Thanks for reading our Newsletter.
We hope it was informative & fun.
Please share our newsletter with other dog lovers!

-Beverly Ulbrich,  The Pooch Coach
www.poochcoach.com
Copyright © 2017 The Pooch Coach, All rights reserved.

HOW TO HELP YOUR SENIOR DOG

HOW TO HELP YOUR SENIOR DOG

HOW TO HELP YOUR SENIOR DOG

 

My dog, Kompis, is only 12.5 years old, but is already blind and quite senile.  It’s sometimes difficult to figure out how to help your senior dog.  I’ve been capturing some of our struggles and joys in pictures and video so that I can share them with others who are also struggling, or may be in the future.

 

how to help your senior dog

 

It helps to know there are others out there with the same issues.  And, I hope by giving you some behavior tips, it will make the transition a bit easier.

 

In this first video I released, I show how Kompis regularly gets herself stuck in places around my house. These incidents were all from one day (and there were more that day that I didn’t film).

 

When dogs get senile, one of the first things they lose is the ability to back up. So, when they get stuck behind something, or in a corner, they think there’s no way out.

 

What I’ve been doing (and suggest others do as well) are 2 things:
1. trying to keep Kompis’ independence & spirits up and not let her feel helpless.
2. keeping her mind working as much as possible.

 

That means not lifting her up and moving her. This only further confuses blind dogs anyway! I help her solve her own predicaments as much as possible. That’s what you’ll see here.

 

The second thing I posted was showing there still is joy in our lives.  I wanted to share how much she still enjoys seeing the people she loves. Her God-Dog-Parents came over last weekend, and I grabbed my phone after a bit so I could capture her little squeals of joy.

 

Watch how happy & excited & energetic she is!

 

 

When you have an older dog, you can still find things they enjoy. Some still get joy out of food, some find joy greeting other dogs, some like to visit their favorite park or beach, and some find comfort being with their favorite people.

 

Find your dog’s joy, and let them bring a smile to your face and warmth to your heart. It’s a win-win.

 


So far, the main things I’ve learned that I’d like to pass on to you are:

 

1. You have to be incredibly patient.

If you thought having a puppy was tough, it was nothing.  Now you have to deal with a dog who WAS trained and who never peed in the house or got in harm’s way, start to do it all over again.  But now they might be blind and/or deaf.  They also move incredibly slowly, so expect everything to take at least twice as long as it used to.

  • If it took 3 mins for them to pee in the backyard, expect to wait up to 15 mins now.
  • If your walk around the park took 5 mins, plan on 10-20 mins now.
  • If they ate their food in 30 seconds, be prepared for it to take several minutes, while you help them find it, partially hand-feed, or even help them stand up the whole time.
  • If they used to respond to a command the first time you said it, expect it to take 2 or 3 more attempts now, if they can hear or understand you at all.

 

2. It’s sad

Watching your dog age is very hard.  It might happen quickly or gradually but, one day, you’ll wake up and realize you have a different dog.  You’ll notice that they don’t want to play like they used to, they stop being as eager for food or treats, they forget the commands they knew so well, they slip & fall, they bump into things, and/or they get easily confused.  They move more slowly, have trouble getting up, and they no longer greet you with the usual exuberant vigor that brought you so much joy at the end of the day.  Sometimes, they forget who you are.  It’s a difficult thing to go through.  Be prepared to cry daily, unless you’re really, really tough.

 

3. It’s exhausting

Expect to be mentally and emotionally drained from dealing with all of this.  Take care of yourself.

 

If your dog has sundowner’s syndrome like mine does, you can be woken up every hour or 2 all throughout the night.  They no longer tolerate being crated – it makes them panic.  They pace, they act agitated. It’s awful.

 

If you’re lucky enough that they don’t have this issue, they will still most likely need to go to the bathroom more often, so don’t expect them to hold it all night like they used to. Be prepared to get up earlier or in the middle of the night to allow them to relieve themselves.

Dog gets in her crate

Kompis in her little portable crate – she no longer easily relaxes in it.

 

Lastly, they wander – they walk off of beds & couches & cliffs.  Even if they can see a little, their depth perception is off.  Add in a bit of senility, and you have a dog who can never be left alone, and requires you constantly getting up and checking on them – or saving them from danger.   So, basically, some of these dogs, including my Kompis, require 24 X 7 care.  It’s more like having a 2 year old child than a dog at this point.   You can’t leave a blind, confused dog alone. It would be cruel!

 

4. Deciding when to let them go is one of the hardest decisions you’ll ever make.

I’ve read dozens of articles on this, and even have experience doing this for my last dog as well as with other people’s pets.  But you’re never prepared.  Each case is so different.  We don’t want them to suffer, but we don’t want to say goodbye too soon.  I certainly do not want to put my dog down because she’s inconveniencing me.  But I also don’t want her to injure herself and have to rush her to the ER to be hurriedly put down while she’s in pain (and, I promised her no more hospitals or vets!)  So, I struggle and struggle.  I take it day by day.  You just have to wait until you “know” it’s the right time in your heart.

 

One tip I read often that resonated with me is that it’s better to say goodbye 1 day or even 1 week early than 1 minute too late.

 

I suggest finding a housecall vet… there are many good ones:  Blue Sparrow Holistic, Vet on Wheels, & Lotus Vets are my personal favorites for vet care as well as for euthanasia.   You can have it done in your home or even at your pup’s favorite park or beach.  I definitely did not and do not want it done in my home (I want my memories there to be of them being alive and don’t want this memory etched in my mind in my home).  Think about what makes you and, most importantly, your dog, happiest.  Plan ahead.

 

how to help your senior dog

Kompis receiving vet care in the comfort of her home from Dr Araba of Blue Sparrow

 


That’s all for this round.   Look for more senior dog tips over the next few weeks as I find the strength to post & share.

 

Keeping Your Dog Safe And Happy During Winter Months

Keeping Your Dog Safe And Happy During Winter Months

Keeping Your Dog Safe And Happy During Winter Months

 

Special thanks to our guest blogger, Janice Miller of Safety Today.*

 

keeping your dog safe and happy during winter monthsWith a coat of thick fur and a bundle of energy, most dogs enjoy wintertime and the endless play possibilities it brings. Bigger breeds enjoy the brisk air and usually have a great time romping through the snow. However, no matter what breed your dog is, there are some precautions that need to be taken when colder months arrive. It’s important to remember that a thick fur coat is not adequate protection against frostbite or exposure, and many dogs can become dehydrated in winter if they stay outside too long.

 

Fortunately, there are some easy ways to protect your dog from the elements, no matter how big or small. Here are the best tips on keeping your pet safe and happy during the winter.

 

Limit outside time

 

He may love being outside in low temperatures, but no matter what breed your dog is, you’ll need to limit his outdoor play time and bring him in often to warm up and get a drink. Since it’s difficult to keep water from freezing when it gets cold out, you may not be able to leave a bowl for him to drink from outside, and dehydration is a real issue. Let him play, but bring him inside after twenty minutes or so, depending on the temps.

 

Watch for poisons

 

Winter brings beautiful days and fun in the snow, but there are some things you’ll need to watch for when you take your dog for a walk through the neighborhood. Antifreeze, salt, and de-icer are just a few of the toxic chemicals that could be left behind by cars, so keep your pet away from driveways and off the road. If possible, stick to cleared paths at a local park or to the sidewalks. When you get home, wash his feet off with a warm washcloth or pet wipe immediately; if he did pick up any chemicals during the walk, it’s possible he could lick them off once he’s home.

 

It’s also a good idea to go around the house after the holidays and make sure there isn’t any chocolate or other human treats within your pet’s reach. In the right amounts, chocolate can be hazardous to dogs.

 

Don’t slip up

 

Watch for ice during walks, especially if your dog is older or has joint issues. One slip and fall on the ice could lead to a serious injury with a lifetime of complications.

dog jacket

Kompis loves her winter coat!

Warm him up

 

Small or short-haired dogs are especially susceptible to the cold, so invest in a cute doggy sweater or jacket when going out on walks. At home, it might be advantageous to move his bedding away from windows or doors into a warmer spot, and provide him with a blanket; many dogs like to snuggle and get warm during winter months, just like we do.

 

Up the protein

 

While it’s always a good idea to consult a veterinarian before changing your pet’s diet, it might be helpful to add a little more protein to his dinner or give him an extra scoop of food when winter rolls around, especially if he likes to spend time outside. Dogs use up a lot of energy trying to stay warm, so making sure he has enough to eat–or adding tuna or chicken to his regular meal–will go a long way toward keeping him happy and healthy.

 

Hope this helps your dog better enjoy the winter.  Stay warm!

 


*Janice Miller is a veterinarian and is passionate about helping shelter dogs find foster care until they can find permanent homes. She’s proud to be part of Safetytoday.org, educating people on home and community safety.

 

February 2017 News & Tips

February 2017 News & Tips

February News & Tips

Hello!  Welcome to our Feb newsletter.  We hope you enjoy it.

SFDC Meetups for Pooch Coach clients. Come out and practice your handling skills and meet other past & present members of the Pooch Coach Pack. Our next Meetup with FREE training tips, behavior help, treats and socialization practice is:

 

Saturday, March 4th @ 12 noon – 2 PM
at Christopher Playground in SF.

 

Free demos, advice & treats from The Pooch Coach!

 

Come out with your dog for some socialization and some fun. Learn a new trick or 2. Have a question about your dog’s behavior?  The Pooch Coach will be offering free 1-1 advice to attendees.   It’s a great way to practice your dog’s greeting skills with other dogs as well as with humans… All overseen by an expert canine behaviorist.

 

If you are not a Pooch Coach client and would like to attend, please email us at info@poochcoach.com and we will let you know if we can accommodate you,

 

Free Professional photos by Soulful Pet Photography!

 

And all SF Dog Connectors Meetup attendees get free samples of Charlee Bear Dog treats for their pooch!

 

charlee bear dog treats sf dog connectors meetup


Here’s a video of people enjoying previous Meetups – hear what they have to say!

 

Click here to see Meetup testimonials

 

Sign up on our Facebook page: Click here!  Sign up on Meetup.com: Click here!
For more information about our monthly Meetups, Click here.

 

Please “like” our Facebook page or visit us at Meetup.com to ensure you don’t miss future events.


Free Tips in our Award Winning Blog

  

Did you know that The Pooch Coach won 2 awards in 2016 for being one of the best dog blogs in the world?

Check out our blog page here.

Our blog is broken into sections about training, health & nutrition, general tips and even travel tips. You can also access our newsletter archive on that page. You can even subscribe to the blog so you get email notification of new posts, which happen every 1-2 weeks.

 

Here are some of the most popular & a couple recent posts in case you missed them:

 

– Thinking of getting a second dog, or already have one?  Don’t make these mistakes! (New post)

 

– Is your dog scared of loud noisesHere are some quick tips for helping him through the next big bang.

 

– Does your dog go berserk when the doorbell ringsHere’s how to calm him down.

 

– Do you know which human foods are safe for dogs – and which are dangerous or fatal? Here’s a quick overview.

 

– How much water does your dog drink each day?  It’s important to keep track so you know if he’s not feeling well.  Here are guidelines for healthy drinking.


Want more tips?

Check out The Pooch Coach’s Dog Channel!

Click here to visit our YouTube channel and get some free dog training tips & help with common behavior issues.   We’re adding new videos regularly, so please subscribe to get notified of new fun & informational videos.

 

Share our dog tips with your friends!
Over 11,500 fans can’t be wrong…  Join us on Facebook!

The Pooch Coach San Francisco Dog Training

Happy Valentines Day!! 
My dog is my Valentine.  How about you?
Ready for more training?
Book an appt

Thanks for reading our Newsletter.
We hope it was informative & fun.
Please share our newsletter with other dog lovers!

-Beverly Ulbrich,  The Pooch Coach
www.poochcoach.com

Copyright © 2017 The Pooch Coach, All rights reserved.

Can Dogs Eat Bananas?

Can Dogs Eat Bananas?

Can Dogs Eat Bananas?

can dogs eat bananas?

 

10 Toxic Foods, 23 Safe Ones & A Few in the Middle

 

This is not a complete list of what is safe for your dog to eat. Compared to humans, dogs have a lot less to choose from. The one thing that you need to remember is that the body chemistry of dogs is much different from humans. There are stuff that these creatures can take but you can’t. Conversely, some foods that they can eat might send you to the hospital.

 

The rule of thumb is that if you want to feed your four legged friend something but are not sure if it is good for him or not then DO NOT. It’s as simple as that.

 

The fruit in question in the title of this article is bananas. The answer to that is yes, bananas are good for dogs. As long as you keep the amount in control your friend will be fine. This fruit has a lot of things going on for it that your friend can benefit from. Dogs need their dose of vitamins as well and they can get good amounts of potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin B into their bodies. They will make their bodies stronger that what it is.

 

The fruit offers good content of fiber for your best friend dog. Since these animals are voracious eaters, this is one benefit they may need to keep them healthy. There are more food and food groups in the infographic below that can benefit your furry friend and make him healthier.

 

The following infographic lists down several foods that your pal can eat and how much of it is considered healthy. Read closely and consider this as your guide to your dog’s nutrition!

 

Can Dogs Eat Bananas? 10 Toxic Foods, 23 Safe Ones & A Few in the Middle


Pooch Coach editor’s note:  Thanks to our contributing author, Jenny Perkins of  HerePup.com.